Saturday, 21 November 2015

10 enthralling visions for the future of computing

Check out what's coming: Virtual and augmented reality, gesture and facial recognition, holograms and more.

For years, our personal computers were made up of monitors, keyboards, and a big beige box. Then laptops came along and changed everything—until a small, flat plate of glass encased in metal, dubbed the iPhone, showed up and changed everything again, followed shortly thereafter by an even larger plate of glass called the iPad that changed things even more.
As exciting as the iPad was, the original came to us five years ago. Today, we once again face major shifts in for computing. What will that future look like, both in the near term and the slightly further-off future?
Peering into that which hasn’t happened yet is a perilous business, but here are some new visions for computing that technology companies are rolling out soon—as well as a few radical, yet compelling dreams that are still years away from becoming tangible.

Nexus 6P review: This is the way Android phones should be



I am in love with a Nexus phone.
This is not an exaggeration. I wasn’t crazy about the Nexus 6P when I first laid hands on it, but now I’m totally and completely enamored.
I didn’t think it was possible for Google to make a Nexus phone that could excite me. Frankly, I’ve never been that interested in Nexus devices because they were always missing some particularly important feature that Samsung, HTC, or LG did better—or they weren’t compatible with Verizon’s network.
Android has undergone serious evolution in the last year. It’s no longer quite the open-source minefield it used to be. Google’s worked hard to ensure there’s a somewhat consistent experience across devices, and those who don’t abide have started to feel the wrath of the community. We’re seeing drastic changes on the horizon, including the fact that Google now has its very own, bona-fide flagship device that can compete with the hottest phones from other manufacturers.

Surface Book vs. MacBook Pro: It isn't twice as fast. It's three times as fast

Microsoft figured out how to put a discrete GPU into the Surface Book, and it paid off.


Of course we had to pit the Surface Book vs. the MacBook Pro. It’s like Ford vs. Chevy, or Coke vs. Pepsi. Each side has its diehard fans, plus others who just want to know which is better.

Microsoft claims its new Surface Book is “twice” as fast as its equivalent MacBook Pro. Well, we ran some benchmarks, and hate to say it, but Microsoft lied. The Surface Book isn’t twice as fast.

It’s three times as fast.